Jericho Warming Hut - Week 3 Progress Report

July 18, 2011 (Updated on July 25 with More Pictures)

Pictures Courtesy of Roger Richard, John Higgins and Larry Gomes
Story by Larry Gomes

From Saturday, July 9th to Sunday July 17th there was a major push to get as much done on the warming hut as possible.  Several people took vacation days to help out during this week.  Our group of volunteers exceeded even the most optimistic projections by not only getting the warming hut walls built, but by putting on a roof as well!

Every work day starts out with the unloading of the work trailer.  Our "work trailer" is actually a snowmobile
trailer donated by Roger for the summer.  As with any construction project, there is never enough spaces so Roger's
trailer always is filled to overflowing making it difficult to find anything without first unloading it.
 



When the work started on Saturday, the only part of the structure completed was the foundation piers
and the perimeter beam as shown in this picture that was taken the week before.


The crew went right to work installing floor joists on 16" centers for the main cabin floor. 
They also installed a 6" x 6" beam along the front of the porch and then installed porch
floor joists on 12" centers to insure the composite decking on the porch did not bend.

 

By the end of Saturday, the crew had finished the porch decking and the installation of the
main cabin porch joists.  In addition, they had installed cleats along the bottom of the main
cabin joists and cut plywood inserts to fit into each joist opening.  This plywood sub-floor was
caulked and screwed into the cleats to insure that no bugs or critters could get into the cabin
from underneath.

 

On Sunday, the crew started the installation of the floor insulation.  Each bat was cut to the exact
length and carefully placed inside the floor cavity. 

 

With the insulation complete, it was time to install the floor using 3/4" Advantech.
Since we planning on using the Advantech as our finish floor, the group used sanders to
remove the Advantech logo and other markings.
 

The Advantech flooring had diamond shaped ink spots along both sides of each sheet that was taking
 a long time to remove with the vibrator sanders.  So Roger decided to build a makeshift sanding disk using
 a hole saw with sandpaper folded over it and held in place using duct tape.  Reports are the "Redneck
Sanding Disk" worked really well and quickly removed the diamond ink spots.  Roger thinks
thinks he might be able to patent the device as a combo hole-saw & sanding disk, but the rest
of the crew thinks it was a good idea that fulfilled its duty and now should be forgotten.

 

Once the sanding was done, each seam was vacuumed cleaned and caulked.
The plan was to make the floor as waterproof as possible to keep
rain from getting into the insulation below the floor.

 



With the sanding and caulking done, it was time to put on the floor finish. 
We used a product from Perma-Chink called "Sure Shine" that creates
a hard waterproof finish. 

After the 3 coats of floor finish was dry, the floor was
covered with three sheets of plastic to add another layer of waterproofing.
 



While some of the crew members worked on the warming hut floor, Bob Hatch
and John Higgins started work on the generator dog house.  Above Bob fits up one
of the dog house walls.


Roger installs latches on the almost finished dog house.  The roof is hinged to allow easy access
 for starting and stopping the generator.

 



In between all of the other building activity, Steve Szafran found some time to help out with
site work.  A York rake on a tractor was used to get rid of the larger rocks, but then
the entire site had to be hand raked to get rid of the smaller rocks. 

 

This is a view of the site after all the hand raking was done.


 

On Tuesday, a lull donated by Pro-Quip Rentals in Gorham arrived.

 

On Wednesday, the warming hut delivery truck arrived.  The driver did have some trouble
on one steep section of the access road.  He had to back up to get a running start to make
it up one of the hills, but he eventually made it.

 

Here Roger unloads the delivery truck with the lull.

 

The logs have been removed from the truck and are ready for unpacking.

 

Since the logs were packed to minimize space during shipping, everything was out of order.  We unpacked
the logs and sorted them under the pavilion.  Each row of logs is a labeled with the a different letter so the logs
were arranged under the pavilion in rows from A to K.

 



As each row of logs was needed, it was loaded onto the lull and boomed out over the
floor of the warming saving lots of carrying time.

 

Roger made up a jig to bend a 90-degree angle into the flashing.  This jig worked great
allowing us to bend up 60 feet of flashing in no time at all.  The flashing fits under the
first row of logs to keep any water from getting in under the logs.  Note the plastic covering
protecting the floor and the stack of logs ready to be installed.


Just as we were about to start building, the skies opened up and we took cover.  After it was over, mother nature
treated us to a beautiful rainbow that started at the beginning of the Scenic View trail and
reached up from the valley floor.



Larry driving the first screw in the first log of the warming hut project.

 



Roger driving the second screw in the warming hut project.

 



By the end of Wednesday, we had unloaded the log truck, sorted the logs and managed to install
the first row of logs in spite of a weather delay.
 



On Thursday, things really began to move along.  Perfect weather and no distractions meant the logs were
being installed at the rate of one row per hour.


By lunchtime, the walls of the warming hut have reached the level where the window frames must be installed.
Here Mike Roy puts foam tape and plastic splines along the sides of one of the window frames. 
The splines and foam tape fit into groves that are pre-cut into the ends of the logs that
butt up against the window frames creating a tight seal. 
 



Bob Morin and Mike Roy staple down foam insulation tape along the top of the logs.  This tape
gets squeezed down by the next row of logs to form an air tight seal.




By the end of Thursday, another 7 rows of logs had been installed and the log cabin was half built.
 The braces were installed to keep the window and door frames square as the walls were going up.
 

The yellow rope hanging off the ends of the logs is used with a come-along to squeeze the
logs tightly together before they are screwed down with timber screws spaced at 18" intervals.
In this picture, Chris Therault and Gary White are using high-torque Dewalt drills to install timber screws.


The last row of logs needed to complete the cabin walls is delivered by the lull.
 



Roger and his brother Larry building the back gable end wall.
 



Just two days after the logs arrived, they are all installed!  Here Larry Richard, Roger Richard
and Larry Gomes pose in front of the completed cabin walls.  Not shown in the picture
is Chris Therault, Gary White and Bob Morin who had to leave a little early.
 

On Saturday, the roof installation begins.  The top two logs were removed and cut
to receive the center beam and they are sitting on the beam ready to be installed.
 

The center beam was carefully lifted into place and fastened to the back gable wall.
A center support post and two roof rafters hold the front of the center beam in place.
 

Rafters were cut 10 at a time and then installed.  Each side used a separate rafter pattern
to insure the rafters fit snugly against the beam and the top of the cabin walls.  In the foreground,
 a pile of cut rafters is ready to be installed.
 

By the end of Saturday, the rafter installation was complete.


On Sunday, the crew installed the roof sheathing. Staging provided by local
contractor George Falardeau was used to give a stable work platform.
 

Here Ray Borbeau nails down the sheathing using a Paslode nail gun.
 



George cuts some of the sheathing just before it is passed up the roofing crew.
 

One side of the roof is complete and just one more row of sheathing needs
to be installed before the job is finished.


 Here Roger celebrates the completed roof job with his nail gun and hammer held high!
 



 A birds eye view from the roof of the warming hut.  The hut was designed to face Jericho Mountain and
it looks like Matt Godbout (our excavator operator) did a great job in getting the foundation lined up.

 

A blue tarp was installed to protect the warming hut until the metal roof is installed.
 

Many Thanks to our group of Warming Hut Work Week Volunteers!

Name

Sat 7/9

Sun 7/10

Mon 7/11

Tue 7/12

Wed 7/13

Thu 7/14

Fri 7/15

Sat 7/16

Sun 7/17

Ray Borbeau

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

George Falardeau

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Larry Gomes

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Robert Gomes

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Hatch

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Higgins

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Eric Johnson

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob Morin

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

Larry Richard

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Roger Richard

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Tucker Riendeau

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Roy

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Chris Theriault

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

Gary White

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Steve Zsafran

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Now that the basic structure of the warming hut is complete, we will be working weekends to install the windows, doors, electrical panel, lighting, etc.  We will also be sanding and staining the exterior and interior of the warming hut.

We hope you will consider donating a day or two of your time to help finish the warming hut.

If you can help, please contact larry@twolakeslodge.com with the days you are available.

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